May 31, 2012

Healing with Traditional Chinese Medicine

Filed under: Facts and Tips,massage — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 7:54 am

Acupressure & tuina massage

Acupressure is the stimulation of acupuncture points with fingers rather than with needles. Tuina (pronounced “twee-naw”) is a type of traditional therapeutic massage that can include acupressure.

BEST FOR: Musculoskeletal or neurological- based pain throughout the body.

WHAT TO EXPECT: Tuina and acupressure sessions can last 30 to 60 minutes. Recipients are often fully clothed. Expect hard pressure and vigorous stimulation.

HOW IT WORKS: Meant to manipulate the “energy” along meridians, acupressure and tuina work in the same way as acupuncture: they trigger the release of painreducing endorphins and increase or reduce blood flow. Neither treatment is considered as effective, but they can help people warm up to acupuncture therapy if they feel nervous about needles, says Lillian Huang, L.Ac., Ph.D., an acupuncturist in Hayward, Calif.

Source: By Hilda Brucker http://www.naturalhealthmag.com/health/healing-traditional-chinese-medicine?page=2


May 30, 2012

Ease Your Anxiety

Filed under: Facts and Tips,massage — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 7:51 am

How can I ease anxiety?

How can I ease anxiety?

an INTEGRATIVE PSYCHIATRIST says:
Anxiety is a physiological response to fear that feels especially intense for people with low self-esteem or perfectionist personalities.
TREATMENT: I see anxiety as the springboard to finding inner calm. In a session, I talk with patients to discover the root cause—which may be current or go as far back as childhood. I also perform therapeutic touch by placing my hands about five inches above their chakras. This dislodges and draws the energy of negative emotions to the heart chakra, where it dissipates.
SELF-HELP: Do aerobic exercise to boost dopamine and serotonin levels, and avoid stimulants. As soon as an anxiety attack starts, put your hand over your heart to stimulate the chakra’s warm energy. At the end of a good day, commend yourself for being calm—it’s heroic.
—Judith Orloff, M.D., assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA and author of Emotional Freedom (Crown Publishing, 2009)

a TCM PRACTITIONER says:
In Traditional Chinese Medicine, there are two roots of anxiety: the blockage of qi, or life energy, in the liver and heart, which causes poor digestion; and a deficiency of yin (the body’s tranquil side), which causes insomnia and is more common in women.
TREATMENT: To mobilize qi, I give weekly acupuncture along the liver meridian on the legs and shiatsu-style massage. To nourish yin-deficient blood, I perform moxibustion by placing the lit tip of the mugwort herb above acupoints along the spleen, heart, and pericardium meridians on the arm.
SELF-HELP: To keep qi from stagnating, try playing sports. Or snack on dried longan, a nutty-tasting Chinese fruit similar to a lychee that nourishes yin. You can also try acupressure. Find a professional to teach you anxiety-easing acupoints like heart 7 on the wrist.
—Bryn Clark, L.Ac., Dipl. O.M., of the New Harmony Center for Health & Wellness in Massachusetts

an AYUREVEDIC PHYSICIAN says:
Stress releases cortisol into the bloodstream. Because cortisol is acidic, it irritates the lymphatic and digestive systems—and thus vata, the dosha (or life force) in the colon that’s linked to the nervous system.
TREATMENT: I plan a diet and herbal regimen for my patients based on their symptoms, allergies, eating habits, and genetic predispositions. I recommend they eat only three meals a day so they burn fat, which is the calmest source of energy. To energize but not overstimulate vata, I recommend herbal adaptogens like tulsi and ashwagandha.
SELF-HELP: Try sarvabhyanga, a selfmassage that calms the peripheral nervous system, for one or two minutes in the shower. Use circular strokes to massage herbal sesame oil on your head, joints, and feet, and longer strokes over your bones.
—John Douillard, D.C., Ph.D., director of the LifeSpa Retreat Center and Clinic in Boulder, Colo.

Source: Edited by Danel Mazori http://www.naturalhealthmag.com/print/7630


May 29, 2012

Massage Yourself To Sleep

Filed under: Facts and Tips,massage — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 8:13 am

Soothing Massage to Clear the Senses and Calm the Spirit

Massage grounds and settles you while refocusing scattered energy. Sishencong, which soothes a point on the crown of your head, addresses headaches, nervousness, and insomnia; mingmen helps strengthen the kidneys and draw energy into your center of gravity, creating a sense of calm.

Sishencong Chi Massage
How to Do It
Lying on your back in bed, put one hand on top of your head and begin to move it in a circular motion about 2 inches in diameter. As you gently massage this point, visualize all your thoughts transforming into one. Put your other hand on your belly to help ground yourself more in your body. Continue for three to five minutes.

Mingmen Massage
How to Do It
Mingmen is a point on your lower back, between the kidneys and behind your belly button. Turn onto your side, in fetal position. Make a loose fist and massage yourself at this mingmen point with a circular motion, 30 times in one direction and 30 times in the other. Counting can help you relax and fall asleep. If you’re still awake after a few minutes, repeat the exercise, and then rest your hand by your side and notice the sense of calm you feel.

 

Source:

Body+Soul, July/August 2006 http://www.marthastewart.com/134970/flow-sleep-exercises


May 28, 2012

Remembering & Honoring

Filed under: News / Events — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 7:48 am

 

Rizzieri School for the Healing Arts would like to take a moment to remember the sacrifice and honor shown by our men and women in military uniform ~ this day is for ALL who served this great country!


May 25, 2012

Quote of the Week

Filed under: Quote of the Week — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 8:07 am


May 24, 2012

Stress Fix after a Long Day

Filed under: Aveda Product — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 8:27 am

How do you unwind after a long day? Find relief in a bath with Stress Fix Soaking Salts.


May 23, 2012

Which List Do You Live By – Part 2

Filed under: Facts and Tips — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 7:52 am

We all lead busy, hectic lives, with even busier schedules and demands.  But have you stopped to think about the ways that you live your life?   We found a great article by Kathy Gruver, that helps you assess where your priorities are. Here’s the guide to living your life with less stress…

Stay Healthy

  • Associate with positive, supportive people.
  • Take personal responsibility.
  • Know that others have bad times, too.
  • Live in the present. Don’t dwell on the past or fatalize about the future.
  • Take risks to grow and evolve.
  • Tell people of your successes and accomplishments. They can learn from you.
  • Relax.
  • Don’t make excuses. The time is now.
  • Know that what you think has profound influence on your body.
  • Find a way to remove yourself from bad situations, like jobs or partners. Or, at least, change your attitude.
  • Laugh.
  • Don’t blame or resent people from your past. Healing comes from forgiveness and moving forward.
  • Speak only positively about yourself.
  • Eat slowly, in a calm environment.
  • Don’t use words like “never” and “always.”
  • Stretch, eat right, drink enough water, have healthy bowels, and have bodywork done.

 

Kathy Gruver is a massage therapist and naturopath. This feature is adapted from her 2010 book The Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Hundreds of Ways to Take Charge of Your Health, Naturally (Infinity Publishing, 2010). For more information, visit www.thealternativemedicinecabinet.com.


May 22, 2012

Which List Do You Live By – Part 1

Filed under: News / Events — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 8:16 am

We all lead busy, hectic lives, with even busier schedules and demands.  But have you stopped to think about the ways that you live your life?   We found a great article by Kathy Gruver, that helps you assess where your priorities are.

Test Fate

  • Find other negative people and make them your best friends.
  • Blame luck for everything.
  • Say “Why me?” a lot.
  • Live in the past.
  • Tell everyone you meet how horrible your life is. Make it an identity instead of an anecdote.
  • Don’t relax. After all, you’re very busy.
  • Make excuses in life: “After the kids leave home,” “When I’m older,” “I’m too young.”
  • Believe that what you think has no effect on your body.
  • Stay in a job you don’t like or with a spouse you can’t stand.
  • Hold on to your anger and emotions.
  • Put yourself down at every turn.
  • Eat too fast, and when you are stressed and upset.
  • Envy everyone else for what you don’t have.
  • Try to live up to what others think you should be, ignoring your own goals and desires.
  • Let fear guide you and keep you stuck.
  • Try to fix everyone else. They’re broken.

Kathy Gruver is a massage therapist and naturopath. This feature is adapted from her 2010 book The Alternative Medicine Cabinet: Hundreds of Ways to Take Charge of Your Health, Naturally (Infinity Publishing, 2010). For more information, visit www.thealternativemedicinecabinet.com.


May 21, 2012

Voorhees Town Center Farmer’s Market Every Saturday

Filed under: News / Events — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 8:29 am

This past weekend, we were proud to be a part of another community activity. The Voorhees Town Center Farmer’s Market. We are excited of the evolution of our street scape, and happy to see many new faces in our area. We provided complimentary face painting during the grand opening of the farmer’s market on Saturday.

We hope that you’ll stop by and visit us. Voorhees Town Center’s Farmers Market takes place every Saturday now thru October 27 from 8am until 12noon! Make a day of it, and come visit Rizzieri Aveda School for a quick cut and color, or facial. Or visit the Rizzieri Studio Salon for a haircut!


May 18, 2012

Quote of the Week

Filed under: Quote of the Week — Rizzieri School of Massage @ 8:06 am


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